How-to Hand Sanitizer WHO formula

Rural areas with a distillery are stepping up to the challenge. Local Distillery in Hoodsport is making hand sanitizer for critical services teams.

The Hardware Distillery | Distilling Fine Spirits in Hoodsport, Washington

Donations to Mason County non-profits will continue, just contact us. Until we re-open, our hand sanitizer will be available at the Hoodsport grocery, and the Hama Hama Oyster Co store. And look for safe outdoor hand sanitizer pop-ups! Plans are in the works.

Using the WHO formula.

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Germany Actions to Mitigate Corona Virus

Include social distance, plus moving toward temporary tracking of people in motion.

Vodaphone is one cellular company in Germany that is contributing.

Vodafone launches five-point plan to help counter the impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak

The spread of COVID-19 across Europe is having a significant impact on our day-to-day lives, changing the way we interact with others, introducing new ways of working and curtailing our movements as we adhere to new measures introduced by governments to limit infection and protect the more vulnerable within our societies.

 

Focus on Innovation: Govtech and Metrolabs

Innovation of the Month

Do you know of an interesting project that involves local government and university partners? Fill out our nomination form to help inform our selection process for our Innovation of the Month Award by nominating a team (or yourself) for the honor.

Kansas City Takes Data-Driven Approach to Addressing Blight

MetroLab Network has partnered with Government Technology to bring its readers a segment called the MetroLab Innovation of the Month Series, which highlights impactful tech, data, and innovation projects underway between cities and universities. If you’d like to learn more or contact the project leads, please contact MetroLab at info@metrolabnetwork.org for more information.

 

Scratching Below the Surface: IoT Privacy Risk

Further to the topic of Privacy & Security for Smart Cities (E. Kenneally, “Scratching Below the Surface: IoT Privacy Risk,” in IEEE Internet of Things Magazine, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 8-10, SEPTEMBER 2018. doi: 10.1109/MIOT.2018.8552484, available at https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8717595):

This column delves into privacy risks of the IoT using risk concepts that are more native to the security domain in order to conceptually bridge our collective understanding, articulation, and management of privacy concerns in the IoT which otherwise might not be sufficiently considered or foreseen by existing legal and technical controls. It has become almost cliché that the so called Internet of Things (IoT) means different things to different people. When it comes to privacy and security risks, what is implicit across the myriad conceptualizations of IoT lies the key to unearthing why IoT risk heralds a difference with a distinction compared to traditional offline and online contexts. Critics of an exceptionalist view of IoT risk might contend that the IoT is really just distributed computing on steroids, i.e., the IoT is merely a relabeling and repackaging of technologies past like client-server, web services, SoA, mobile, virtualization, and distributed computing, which means that risk management is merely an exercise in grafting the decades-long understanding of privacy and security from those familiar contexts onto the IoT. Without getting into a religious debate, it is incontrovertible that there are advances in the quality and quantity of data collection from IoT technologies as opposed to previous generations of technology, and these are driven by real and prospective socioeconomic value propositions.