NIST GCTC Expo Registration Available

We’re on track in the Data Supercluster for an exciting Expo event. Check out the details at the NIST GCTC Expo web site and sign up. Its free to attend, but you must register.

Smart and Secure Cities and Communities Challenge Expo

In 2019, Global City Teams Challenge brings you the Smart and Secure Cities and Communities Challenge (GCTC-SC3) Expo, co-hosted by NIST and U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T).

Toronto and Sidewalk Labs Smart Cities Experiment

How should the NIST Data blueprint address privacy, innovation, Open Data? Sidewalk Labs has revealed part of their plan for smart city development in Toronto.

Sidewalk Labs reveals latest plans for Toronto ‘smart city’ development

Expansive public spaces, roads that can change in colour and use, and buildings that act as open malls are some of the design ideas Google affiliate Sidewalk Labs shared in a public meeting Tuesday evening, as part of the consultation process for its proposed “smart city” development on Toronto’s waterfront.

Sidewalk Labs by Alphabet (google) Developing a Sensor Laden Parcel in Toronto

We’re working to better understand the licensing of data produced by sensors installed and owned by the Alphabet/Google project designed by their Sidewalk Labs.

Sidewalk Labs will reveal their plan for smart city technology.

What are your questions about this effort? Should all the sensor data be available to on an Open and Free basis?

Which new Privacy and Security regulations will be tested here? How will Citizens participate? Will Google collect data as they do online, without total transparency?

Will you be required to wear a ‘cookie’ when you enter the region?

Is the goal of community leaders of smart city experiments run by private industry, to achieve benefits to Citizens, Businesses, Government, Education, Public Safety, and other stakeholders?

Welcome to the neighbourhood. Have you read the terms of service? | CBC News

The L-shaped parcel of land on Toronto’s eastern waterfront known as Quayside isn’t much to look at. There’s a sprawling parking lot for dry-docked boats opposite aging post-industrial space, where Parliament Street becomes Queens Quay. To its south is one of the saddest stretches of the Martin Goodman trail, an otherwise pleasant running and biking route that spans the city east to west.